New to coding..Like totally....

Joedub1421Joedub1421 USMember

Hey everyone, new user here. My background in IT is network management etc. So not new to the industry but feeling the need for a possible career move. 43 and feeling the need to want to create as opposed to just support. So here are the questions.

Which platform? I want to work with mobile devices mostly but not limited to only.

Languages to choose from? Doing my research it seems js or C# might be the way to go. Opinions?

Native or Framework? My head has exploded, so many options and opinions. Was thinking Xanarim but reading up people seem to have a more hate/love relationship with its short comings. Native seems the way to learn from the ground up. As a beginner learning anything, learn from the bottom up and avoid frameworks?

My goal is to develop apps related to some of my customers industries and make some things easier for them. As well as management apps as a side thing.

I know it's going to be a long road and might not be easy at times but I'm willing to put the work in.

Regards,
Joe

Posts

  • RishubNagpalRishubNagpal USMember ✭✭

    Perhaps java+android would be the best way to go. I recommend you learn a language properly before moving to mobile

  • Joedub1421Joedub1421 USMember

    @RishubNagpal said:
    Perhaps java+android would be the best way to go. I recommend you learn a language properly before moving to mobile

    I definitely think learning from the ground up is the best way. Why I was curious if I'd be able to get the same level of foundation say If I used Xanarim in conjunction or just learn line by line. As if I'm correct if I went with Java/js Eclipse seems to be one of the goto programs for developing Java/js. Am I wrong in this though?

  • RishubNagpalRishubNagpal USMember ✭✭

    Learning something like > @Joedub1421 said:

    @RishubNagpal said:
    Perhaps java+android would be the best way to go. I recommend you learn a language properly before moving to mobile

    I definitely think learning from the ground up is the best way. Why I was curious if I'd be able to get the same level of foundation say If I used Xanarim in conjunction or just learn line by line. As if I'm correct if I went with Java/js Eclipse seems to be one of the goto programs for developing Java/js. Am I wrong in this though?

    Learning something like xamarin or android alongside may end up confusing you. Personally, I wouldn't, but it's up to you on how you wish to learn. You can use eclipse for java yes. Also, despite their similar names, java and javascript are very very different

  • Joedub1421Joedub1421 USMember

    @RishubNagpal said:
    Learning something like > @Joedub1421 said:

    @RishubNagpal said:
    Perhaps java+android would be the best way to go. I recommend you learn a language properly before moving to mobile

    I definitely think learning from the ground up is the best way. Why I was curious if I'd be able to get the same level of foundation say If I used Xanarim in conjunction or just learn line by line. As if I'm correct if I went with Java/js Eclipse seems to be one of the goto programs for developing Java/js. Am I wrong in this though?

    Learning something like xamarin or android alongside may end up confusing you. Personally, I wouldn't, but it's up to you on how you wish to learn. You can use eclipse for java yes. Also, despite their similar names, java and javascript are very very different

    Ahh ok....Looks like like again best way is from the ground up. Thank you sir....

  • JohnHardmanJohnHardman GBUniversity mod
    edited July 2016

    @Joedub1421 - I wouldn't recommend Xamarin.Forms for somebody new to development. I probably wouldn't even recommend Xamarin for Android or Xamarin for iOS for somebody new to development. The learning curve would be too much for most newbies.

    @RishubNagpal 's suggestion of Java + Android is probably a good way to start mobile development, but you might just want to do Java on a desktop first to learn Java well before then progressing to Android.

    If you later want to develop cross platform using Xamarin.Forms, the jump from Java to C# is not a difficult one, but the learning curve for Xamarin.Forms and all the workarounds required is a big one.

  • Joedub1421Joedub1421 USMember

    @JohnHardman said:
    @Joedub1421 - I wouldn't recommend Xamarin.Forms for somebody new to development. I probably wouldn't even recommend Xamarin for Android or Xamarin for iOS for somebody new to development. The learning curve would be too much for most newbies.

    @RishubNagpal 's suggestion of Java + Android is probably a good way to start mobile development, but you might just want to do Java on a desktop first to learn Java well before then progressing to Android.

    If you later want to develop cross platform using Xamarin.Forms, the jump from Java to C# is not a difficult one, but the learning curve for Xamarin.Forms and all the workarounds required is a big one.

    @John Hardman - Appreciate the assistance good sir. After some more research I'm going to start out and master java as best I can. Looks like Pluralsight has some decent video tutorials I can begin with. Java + IntelliJ will be my starting point. Everyone has an opinion and it seems alot of people say "Once you master java you can learn C#" alot easier then the other way around. We'll see if that is true or not lol...Any good resources you can point me to?

    Regards,
    Joe

  • JohnHardmanJohnHardman GBUniversity mod

    @Joedub1421 - Everybody has their own ways of learning. For somebody completely new to programming, I'd go for something like the following:

    For Java:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Java-Programming-24-Hour-Trainer-Yakov/dp/111895145X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1470129978&sr=8-1&keywords=Java+programming+24+hour+trainer

    For C#, but this is so old now that I don't know whether changes to C# over the years have made it out-of-date even as a starter guide:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sams-Teach-Yourself-Language-Days/dp/0672325462/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1470130169&sr=8-2&keywords=C#+in+21+days

    Even if not precisely these two books, something that attempts to give you a run down on the range of what's possible is good for somebody new to coding, whether that be a "in 21 days", in "7 days" or "24 hour trainer" books.

  • Joedub1421Joedub1421 USMember

    .xa> @JohnHardman said:

    @Joedub1421 - Everybody has their own ways of learning. For somebody completely new to programming, I'd go for something like the following:

    For Java:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Java-Programming-24-Hour-Trainer-Yakov/dp/111895145X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1470129978&sr=8-1&keywords=Java+programming+24+hour+trainer

    For C#, but this is so old now that I don't know whether changes to C# over the years have made it out-of-date even as a starter guide:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sams-Teach-Yourself-Language-Days/dp/0672325462/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1470130169&sr=8-2&keywords=C#+in+21+days

    Even if not precisely these two books, something that attempts to give you a run down on the range of what's possible is good for somebody new to coding, whether that be a "in 21 days", in "7 days" or "24 hour trainer" books.

    @JohnHardman - Thank you for the insight, I'm definitely going to be doing Java first then if when I get a mastery of it move into C#. I use www.pluralsight.com for my other IT video stuff. Watched a tutorial and the first run though as expected was rough lol...Some things made sense in a logical way others went way over my head.

    Thanks again good sir.....I joined codingforums.com which seems to have a fairly large community. Any other online resources you could recomend?

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