My impression so far with using the Visual Studio-version of Xamarin

QuakeulfQuakeulf ✭✭✭NOMember ✭✭✭

You are building a house and you need bricks for the walls, but the bricks supplied by the only manufacturer around are not fully square so you need to reshape them. To do this you need tools, but the tools are not completely done yet. The hammer is quite rough in shape so you need to ship it off to the factory between each swing, and the chisel is a placeholder made out of porcelain. To avoid breaking the porcelain you decide to just swing the hammer at the bricks carefully to chip off smaller pieces, but this takes an eternity and the bricks are fragile so they break in half after a few swings. You decide to see if the bricks can offset each others to complete a straight wall, but they have too uneven shapes that leaves gaps so the mortar is seeping through and gets hard to control. You try to set up wooden straightwalls on either side of the brickwall to help placement of bricks, but the brickwall catches fire from lightning in a sudden thunderstorm, the mortar gets soggy from the rain, and the wall slides into the mud.

The next day you try again with slightly improved tools and you end up with about 25% of the wall you began building the previous day. Unknowingly during the night the bricks you used are made redundant. When you get back to work the day after, you cannot find more compatible bricks so you have to start over again.

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  • ClintStLaurentClintStLaurent ✭✭✭✭✭ USUniversity ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2017

    Humorous. Don't know the point though. Xamarin doesn't mesh with your coding style. Ok. Don't use it. I've seen MANY WinForms coders make complaints about WPF because they never took the time to actually learn and understand it. That didn't make WPF bad - it just meant they didn't know what they were doing and blamed it on the tech.

    If the tech were as bad as you make it out to be thousands of major companies wouldn't be using it - and not just in small ways. Is it perfect: heck no. But no tech is. You just get used to the quirks and working with/around them no matter what you're dealing with whether its .NET, java, swift... I'd much rather deal with the quirks of Xamarin, in one place... than be building in java for android and its quirks, swift for ios and its quirks, C# for UWP and its quirks... At least in Xamarin you reduce down the quirks to a common set, for the most part.

    But if you don't like it that's cool. Nobody's forcing you to use it. I didn't like 5 other trucks before buying my first dodge ram - but I didn't feel compelled to go post on the Ford site all my complaints. I just bought what I liked and moved on.

  • QuakeulfQuakeulf ✭✭✭ NOMember ✭✭✭

    I have so far had very good experience with the standalone Xamarin Studio app.

  • ClintStLaurentClintStLaurent ✭✭✭✭✭ USUniversity ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well... Xamarin Studio won't be seeing any more updates. Its basically redundant. Microsoft has no reason to spend tens of thousands on a competing and less powerful IDE.

  • ChrisColeTechChrisColeTech ✭✭✭ USMember ✭✭✭
    edited April 2017

    I'd ignore the fanboy's like @ClintStLaurent . They're drunk off of the kool-aid. Regardless of an individuals coding style - if the tools are garbage then it'll take forever to get the job done.

    Chances are that the "15,000 companies" that Clint cited are NOT using the visual studio version of Xamarin... because it sucks a**.

    I agree with a lot of your sentiment @Quakeulf - the clunky, buggy design kills productivity.

    There is a lot of 'one step forward - two steps back' with Xamarin...and only people who have had hands on experience "get it"

    Hang in there @Quakeulf, someday a much better solution will arise. Until then, I suggest you learn swift/objective-c

  • QuakeulfQuakeulf ✭✭✭ NOMember ✭✭✭

    I would never pull something out without reference or experience. I have worked with plenty of frameworks, IDEs, engines and what have you in my career, but unfortunately Xamarin for VS2015 CE has been a letdown so far.

    I hope it will improve.

  • HunumanHunuman ✭✭✭✭ GBMember ✭✭✭✭

    Hi @Quakeulf

    Have you tried VS2017 Community as against the old VS2015 one?

    Besides having to install 1 nuget package manually, I have had no issues with VS2017.
    Everything has worked well, including the Intellisense. The only thing shaky is the Previewer, but that is in Beta...

    Do check but AFAIK VS2017 installs side by side with VS2015, so may be worth trying out....

    Hope it works out for you,

    Tim

    @Quakeulf said:

    I would never pull something out without reference or experience. I have worked with plenty of frameworks, IDEs, engines and what have you in my career, but unfortunately Xamarin for VS2015 CE has been a letdown so far.

  • QuakeulfQuakeulf ✭✭✭ NOMember ✭✭✭

    Yes, I did try 2017 on a workstation, but aside from not being able to run the emulator/deploy to phone/build for Android, it worked fine as a text-editor.

  • StevenArchibaldStevenArchibald USMember

    I just posted a blog article, that might help address some of your issues: http://thedotnettavern.blogspot.com/2017/04/fire-somebody-anybody-or-go-home.html

  • HunumanHunuman ✭✭✭✭ GBMember ✭✭✭✭

    @Quakeulf said:
    Yes, I did try 2017 on a workstation, but aside from not being able to run the emulator/deploy to phone/build for Android, it worked fine as a text-editor.

    Oops my mistake, I thought you were looking for assistance, but clearly you just want to vent....

  • QuakeulfQuakeulf ✭✭✭ NOMember ✭✭✭

    These are unfortunately my experiences so far. I would lie if I were to say otherwise.

  • DerekBeattie.6675DerekBeattie.6675 ✭✭ US ✭✭

    @Quakeulf don't feel like the Lone Ranger. I lost an SSD drive and still haven't been able to get back to building and deploying with a clean install of vs2015 stable, vs2015 beta, vs2017, or vs2017 preview.

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