Are the new Amazon Fire tablets suitable for testing Xamarin Forms?

LesCandleLesCandle USMember ✭✭
edited July 2019 in General

With Prime day coming up, I'm in need of an newer Android tablet for testing as I don't have an Android phone.

Would one of the new Amazon Fire Tablets be workable - whereas it could be setup for development?

Are there any tricks to setup one of the 'without special offers' devices?

Any particular version you've had success with?

Curious if I should get a larger one or stay with a smaller size to more closely match an Android phone?

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Answers

  • batmacibatmaci DEMember ✭✭✭✭✭

    why do you think Amazon Fire device is acting different than any other Android tablet? I target also Amazon market but i can test my tablet UI for Google play on Amazon Fire tablet which usually is a good fit. Of course it is not realistic to test Phone UI on a tablet but i believe that it has nothing to do with Amazon Fire in general all tablets. Unless you target tablet first. the things you cannot test on Amazon Fire

    • Google in app purchases
    • Any google and firebase services
    • Google login
      But you can test UI if thats your purpose.
      @JohnHardman how is your experience with Tizen? i am thinking to start as well, especially for samsung watches as popularity increases on those. i got a galaxy watch on prime day. so eager to program tizen. i hope that i wont get disappointed :)
  • JohnHardmanJohnHardman GBUniversity mod

    @batmaci said:
    why do you think Amazon Fire device is acting different than any other Android tablet?

    Various examples. As you mentioned, various Google services have to be mapped instead to Amazon (or other) services. Third-party plugins often do not support Amazon (e.g. Ed Snider's "latestversionplugin" currently does not). Simple things such as getting a splash screen working - a typical XF splash screen implementation fails on the Amazon Fire device that I use for testing. Then there are the APIs that are just not implemented (I cannot think of an example off the top of my head), which requires a check for o/s type/version before calling some APIs (or finding alternative APIs that do exist).

    Amazon Fire devices are not the only ones that require extra effort. I've found it necessary to include tweaks for Huawei, as well as having to add specific permissions for badges to work on various platforms. It'll be interesting to see what happens with Huawei in future - will they continue to use Android, or launch a new o/s due to politics/sanctions? I don't know. Also, any device being used in mainland China (and a few other places) may require apps to be tweaked to cope with poor or no access to various services that we take for granted elsewhere, as well as there being other app stores in use.

    @batmaci said:
    how is your experience with Tizen?

    I looked at Tizen very early on. I built a test app using Tizen directly, rather than XF. I also built a couple of test apps using XF. For me, at that time, it was too much effort, as the XF support was still very limited, English-language documentation was very limited (auto-translate did a terrible job on the non-English docs at the time), and test devices were nigh on impossible to get hold of (I had to import one that was not intended for sale in my country, which came with its own problems). I plan to return to Tizen at some point in future, but not just yet.

  • Aamzon is great brand having millions of usewr worldwide.and it has excellent service with good customer satisfaction.so i think its suitable for testing Xamarin Forms.

  • batmacibatmaci DEMember ✭✭✭✭✭
    You can be disappointed with amazon. I dont see any revenue so far. App installs are very low also. It doesnt really worth it
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