Switch On Off Text is now Tiny

Everything was groovy with my little app up until a few days ago when I updated Xamarin and also all the Nuget packages in my project. Now, the Switch components are playing up.
The text which accompanies the Switch is fine and has not changed.
The graphic of the switch itself has disappeared and the "on/off" text is tiny (as big as a dot).
Can anyone explain that?

I'm using Marshmallow VS emulators, API level 23 and targeting Nougat API 25 (Min version API 23).

The functionality of the Switch still works. I can barely perceive it changing, but it does behave as expected.

Thanks

Answers

  • onefootswillonefootswill AUMember ✭✭

    OK. To explain with pics, the white text is meant to be next to a switch:

    And the switches used to look something like this http://www.edumobile.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/switchesexample4.png

    Have they been deprecated?

  • onefootswillonefootswill AUMember ✭✭

    I'd like to re-focus this question, if I may.

    What happens in professional Xamarin shops when their projects go South?
    Something has happened with my project and I have a few questions around that.
    I've got the notorious:

    Found conflicts between different versions of the same dependent assembly that could not be resolved. These reference conflicts are listed in the build log when log verbosity is set to detailed

    First question. Is this my fault? Did I do something to result in this state? It would be easy to blame Visual Studio and or Xamarin updates, but I'm an introspective kinda guy. If there is something I did which resulted in this, I'd like to avoid that in the future.

    Second Question. What happens with the pros? I'm a web guy. My solutions are stable. If a project becomes unusable, do you copy all the code into a fresh project and carry on from there?

    Do you spend 2 days or more trying to salvage the dire project?

    These are serious questions.

    Let me elaborate with quick story. My manager says to me over a coffee,
    "How's that Xamarin project you are playing around with?"
    "My switches disappeared."
    "What the the f$#k do you mean they disappeared?"
    "Something happened and they're gone."
    "Are they going to come back?"
    "Heck, I don't know. I think I need to start a new project".
    "I thought you told me it is a stable platform."
    "Well, it is, there's just a lot more moving parts than something like WinForms or WPF."
    "How do I sell Xamarin as a candidate for our upcoming offline app?"
    "Beats me. "
    "Seems like a lot of risk and high maintenance overhead."
    "Yeah, welcome to the world or mobile development. Native Android probably has the same problem. Probably. "

  • CharwakaCharwaka INMember ✭✭✭

    Hi @onefootswill

    Why don't you create A Fresh Sample Project with latest Visual Studio 2017 and Xamarin(4.7)

    and try to replicate the following demo code

    https://github.com/xamarin/monodroid-samples/tree/master/SwitchDemo

    More over you can provide some logs to investigate the issue

    If the solution works for you don't forget to mark as answer

  • onefootswillonefootswill AUMember ✭✭

    Thanks @Charwaka for your suggestion. I'm pretty confident that will work. But I was interested in figuring out why this project went sideways. In the real world, I can't imagine periodically creating new projects and dumping it into source control because I have not been able to rescue a project which has corrupted. This is not something I have to deal with in my current job, and I was wondering how Xamarin shops maintain their projects in the face of this instability.

    I've got build logging verbosity dialled up. Is that the kind of logging you were suggesting? I can always post that here (although it will be a pretty massive post).

  • CharwakaCharwaka INMember ✭✭✭
    edited November 14

    @onefootswill said:
    Thanks @Charwaka for your suggestion. I'm pretty confident that will work. But I was interested in figuring out why this project went sideways. In the real world, I can't imagine periodically creating new projects and dumping it into source control because I have not been able to rescue a project which has corrupted. This is not something I have to deal with in my current job, and I was wondering how Xamarin shops maintain their projects in the face of this instability.

    I've got build logging verbosity dialled up. Is that the kind of logging you were suggesting? I can always post that here (although it will be a pretty massive post).

    paste the log in Pastbin And comment the link here

  • onefootswillonefootswill AUMember ✭✭

    @Charwaka said:

    @onefootswill said:
    Thanks @Charwaka for your suggestion. I'm pretty confident that will work. But I was interested in figuring out why this project went sideways. In the real world, I can't imagine periodically creating new projects and dumping it into source control because I have not been able to rescue a project which has corrupted. This is not something I have to deal with in my current job, and I was wondering how Xamarin shops maintain their projects in the face of this instability.

    I've got build logging verbosity dialled up. Is that the kind of logging you were suggesting? I can always post that here (although it will be a pretty massive post).

    paste the log in Pastbin And comment the link here

    Hi @Charwaka . I had to split the log file across 5 bins because it was so big (verbose logging). The bins, in order of the log file, are:

    https://pastebin.com/mvpWehFv
    https://pastebin.com/Wy8AbrmT
    https://pastebin.com/Ay7xsWfL
    https://pastebin.com/tZs4Zx2W
    https://pastebin.com/deuDJCqG

    Hopefully they will shed some light on the matter.

    Thanks

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